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Insurance Companies and the ACA Versus my Son and Autism

I was under the (insert sarcasm here) impression that when the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) was passed all of our lives when dealing with health insurance would improve. I also heard that costs would go down. I heard that out of pocket expenses, which previously could have driven you into bankruptcy, would be reduced.

Ok, nice utopian sales pitch, but we can all agree very little of that has come to pass at least if you have insurance of any kind before the thing passed. I do have a 52 year old single male friend who got word the other day that his plan now covers mammograms, he was happy about that (he is self employed and buys insurance privately and his costs went up for this new coverage btw).

Yes, it is easier for people with pre-existing conditions to get insurance. That is a good thing…at least I think so.

Yes, it is easier for people just coming out of college to get their start in life by staying on their parent’s insurance. This is probably a good thing because not as many of these folks are getting jobs much less one that offers insurance as a benefit.

Now, back to the topic at hand.

I have a son who is mildly autistic. To be specific, for those who also have such a family member (who we love very much, don’t get me wrong), he is an Asperger’s kid.

When seeking treatments for these children a few things are true. There are lots of different therapy options available now that weren’t around even ten years ago. Kudos to the medical professionals who came up with these, I love you guys for helping children like my son.

What these therapies do is ensure that these kids either come off the spectrum completely or they at least are able to cope with the differences between them and everyone else. There is nothing wrong with these kids they just process information differently and are shockingly different in social situations than other people.

We can all agree that person-to-person interaction is necessary when in the workplace. Without some measure of people skills careers grow stagnant, advancement is challenging, etc.

Why bring all this up?

My middle son (whose name is going to stay out of this) is in a variety of treatments, and they are helping a little.

There is one treatment left that all of his various doctors agree he needs…that is where this is problematic.

It is called ABA therapy. The ABA part is an acronym meaning Applied Behavioral Analysis Therapy. For kids like our son it is something that does wonders.

Two things are true, it is fantastic, and it isn’t cheap. It is recommended for his recovery but NOT covered by insurance; it is all out of pocket. It is at least $55/hour multiple hours a week at the LEAST. Then there are other periodic treatments/appointments that are more in the range of $110/hour. By periodic it is at least once a month (give or take). So it isn’t cheap.

Expenditures in the $500 per week range are no unreasonable to expect as a basic level.

So we call the insurance company…hey this thing our doctor is prescribing and saying “You need….”

They say, no that isn’t covered. You see that ABA is an analysis and not a treatment. So the name indicates we don’t cover it.

I asked the question, did you ever cover it.

They responded, we used to but are no longer required to do so.

So, let me get this straight, when did it change…

They responded, oh just a year or two ago as things were implemented for the new health care law.

Well, thank you ACA, I appreciate you throwing an additional $2,000 a month on me.  Appreciate that along with the increased prices for insurance, co-pays, and all the other things you did to make life better.

Now in other areas, the coverage is different for the same insurance provider.  I have a friend who has a mild to moderate Autistic son. They were lucky enough to get ABA covered in their region and the therapy has helped a great deal. The child is starting to speak out and interact with others. Their problem is it has been determined that his son needs more intense therapy, but because he is in his 4th year of ABA therapy, their hours of covered therapy went from 40 hours per week to 17 and the majority of that time has to be spent outside of structured therapy and in unstructured trips to different locations in their town.

Another challenge his family faces in dealing with insurance companies and ABA therapy is the local school system. Since each group/organization has to keep track of what services their son is getting, if there is any overlap, the insurance company will stop covering the ABA therapy.  Anyone who has or knows a child on the spectrum knows for a fact, that these kids cannot get enough therapy. The more therapy they get at a younger age, the better off they are as they grow older and find themselves in mainstream situations.

Humorously (or not depending upon your perspective) I was told by the fine folks at one of the agencies that provide ABA therapy that if I made less money (ready for this)…that their services would be provided as a grant. Free of charge.

How is that for a fun day at the office?

I will continue to work hard and get my son all of the help he needs. I will also continue to fight for author autistic kids and make sure they get all of the help they need, one child at a time.

I know someone is going to say why should they cover it…blah blah…Ok I am with you. Let me explain it this way.

The cost of therapy for a few years when he is younger is much much less than the societal cost (or financial burden) someone who is unable to keep a job places on society and the taxpayers at large. Think of it as an investment. One I am willing to pay by paying the insurance company to cover things. Unfortunately they don’t so I would rather not pay them but thanks to the new federal law I get to keep this policy that doesn’t help. Awesome work Congress and other elected federal officials!!! Keep it up!

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Autistics as targets…scapegoats for others part 7 of 7

This is part 7 of a series. If you have not read part 1, I encourage you to do so, and but if not, everything in italics is carry over from that post in case you have not seen it. If you have, skip past that part and move forward to the new information.

As some of you know I am on the autism spectrum. I am what is known as a highly functional autistic. Do I accomplish things? Sure. Do I have many of the traits autistics have, absolutely. Do I wish I didn’t? Well, I’d be lying if I didn’t say there are days…but then there are days I think I’m just who I am.

My case is a little different than most. I didn’t know I was on the spectrum until I was older (in my 40s). How could that have happened? Well I can sum it up quickly.

About ten years ago I got married to a wonderful, very understanding woman. We have three kids. About the time number two came along we had kids to pediatricians as every parent does. We answered all the questions about a variety of subjects, well our second son is on the spectrum. Then, I called my mother (the child’s grandmother) with a “kid update” and the subject came up. Low and behold, my mother said something along the lines of you were diagnosed with that as a kid and we never told you.

What?

You what?

First, how could you not tell someone. But that’s not the point here. If I had known that years prior it could have saved me from making some huge mistakes in life, or at least allowed me to arm myself appropriately. Am I still angry about this? Well, in some ways, but I can’t change the past, and I can’t change who I am so I’m moving on.

Why put all this on my website, especially when you can see at the top that I have written some books that I hope you read and enjoy? Well, I came across this blog on wordpress called askpergers (askpergers.wordpress.com) that is really well done. He deserves some thank you from me for helping me understand a few things.

The author had a post that deserves some attention. He listed out 7 different reasons for autistics being the targets of bullies, people who would take advantage of someone, or in general what I like to call assholes.

I will go into all 7 of his reasons and why I agree with him or can offer up some measure of personal example of how this happened and what might be possible to do to prevent it in the future.

Autistic people can struggle to ask for help with a problem because of communication skills.

As I understand it most people have trouble admitting there are things they don’t know. It took me until my 40s and a PhD in Physics, along with around 10 years at MIT to understand that there are a LOT of things I don’t understand. Asking for help is part of life.

Have I always asked for help?

Nope. Mostly it is because sometimes it takes me so long to explain to someone what the problem is it is faster for me to solve it myself. Is that my fault? Oh absolutely as I don’t communicate the way most people do.

When I explain something and I think my explanation is obvious, there are times people look at me like a dog with it’s head tilted. I think I’m doing a good job, I’m convinced they are just stupid (I used to think that) and now I get that it’s just me.

I work hard every single day on my communication skills and do now ask for help. I don’t always get it, but is it my fault for not explaining my needs well? Sometimes, because as it turns out the way I explain it the thing I’m asking about doesn’t seem like a big problem to most people. I need to explain not just the issue, but the impact that issue is having on something else, which is not what I am really good at (yet).

I can’t speak for all people on the spectrum, but I know over the years not asking for help has screwed me up more often than it has helped me. It has (and I can admit it) prevented my career from advancing as fast as it could have.

This concludes our seven part series. Will I write more on this subject? Well, who knows what tomorrow may bring, but in the mean time I am working on a few new book projects. Wrapping up another as we speak to be out before Christmas. There are more following that! Enjoy the blog, check out the books, and let’s hope that we can cross the finish line into a movie soon!

Autistics as targets…scapegoats for others part 6 of 7

This is part 6 of a series. If you have not read part 1, I encourage you to do so, and but if not, everything in italics is carry over from that post in case you have not seen it. If you have, skip past that part and move forward to the new information.

As some of you know I am on the autism spectrum. I am what is known as a highly functional autistic. Do I accomplish things? Sure. Do I have many of the traits autistics have, absolutely. Do I wish I didn’t? Well, I’d be lying if I didn’t say there are days…but then there are days I think I’m just who I am.

My case is a little different than most. I didn’t know I was on the spectrum until I was older (in my 40s). How could that have happened? Well I can sum it up quickly.

About ten years ago I got married to a wonderful, very understanding woman. We have three kids. About the time number two came along we had kids to pediatricians as every parent does. We answered all the questions about a variety of subjects, well our second son is on the spectrum. Then, I called my mother (the child’s grandmother) with a “kid update” and the subject came up. Low and behold, my mother said something along the lines of you were diagnosed with that as a kid and we never told you.

What?

You what?

First, how could you not tell someone. But that’s not the point here. If I had known that years prior it could have saved me from making some huge mistakes in life, or at least allowed me to arm myself appropriately. Am I still angry about this? Well, in some ways, but I can’t change the past, and I can’t change who I am so I’m moving on.

Why put all this on my website, especially when you can see at the top that I have written some books that I hope you read and enjoy? Well, I came across this blog on wordpress called askpergers (askpergers.wordpress.com) that is really well done. He deserves some thank you from me for helping me understand a few things.

The author had a post that deserves some attention. He listed out 7 different reasons for autistics being the targets of bullies, people who would take advantage of someone, or in general what I like to call assholes.

I will go into all 7 of his reasons and why I agree with him or can offer up some measure of personal example of how this happened and what might be possible to do to prevent it in the future.

Autistic people give a better, more rewarding reaction when bullied.

Many bullies, or as we say in the politically correct world of the professional workplace, employees with dominant personalities, are looking for a specific reaction from someone when they do their “thing.” They may not even realize it, but they are looking for something.

So, let’s take this in context with the other 6 parts of this series. Autistics will do anything, say anything, even bend over backwards to be liked. Bullies by default don’t seem to like the people they are bullying. Therefore, I have seen it, people on the spectrum will bend over backwards, work their ass off, beg, plead, even screw up their personal lives to make someone happy.

Some people just can’t be happy. People on the spectrum have a hard time understanding that, and will work themselves silly, stay up at night, fret and worry over why this one particular person that they are trying to get to like them to do so, and it took me years to realize that in some cases it just won’t ever happen.

If you are not on the spectrum and you see someone you suspect might be falling into this trap, pull them aside and talk to them. Call it a mentoring moment, whatever you want but give them a hand. They will appreciate it in ways I can’t even begin to describe.

Autistics as targets…scapegoats for others part 5 of 7

This is part 5 of a series. If you have not read part 1, I encourage you to do so, and but if not, everything in italics is carry over from that post in case you have not seen it. If you have, skip past that part and move forward to the new information.

As some of you know I am on the autism spectrum. I am what is known as a highly functional autistic. Do I accomplish things? Sure. Do I have many of the traits autistics have, absolutely. Do I wish I didn’t? Well, I’d be lying if I didn’t say there are days…but then there are days I think I’m just who I am.

My case is a little different than most. I didn’t know I was on the spectrum until I was older (in my 40s). How could that have happened? Well I can sum it up quickly.

About ten years ago I got married to a wonderful, very understanding woman. We have three kids. About the time number two came along we had kids to pediatricians as every parent does. We answered all the questions about a variety of subjects, well our second son is on the spectrum. Then, I called my mother (the child’s grandmother) with a “kid update” and the subject came up. Low and behold, my mother said something along the lines of you were diagnosed with that as a kid and we never told you.

What?

You what?

First, how could you not tell someone. But that’s not the point here. If I had known that years prior it could have saved me from making some huge mistakes in life, or at least allowed me to arm myself appropriately. Am I still angry about this? Well, in some ways, but I can’t change the past, and I can’t change who I am so I’m moving on.

Why put all this on my website, especially when you can see at the top that I have written some books that I hope you read and enjoy? Well, I came across this blog on wordpress called askpergers (askpergers.wordpress.com) that is really well done. He deserves some thank you from me for helping me understand a few things.

The author had a post that deserves some attention. He listed out 7 different reasons for autistics being the targets of bullies, people who would take advantage of someone, or in general what I like to call assholes.

I will go into all 7 of his reasons and why I agree with him or can offer up some measure of personal example of how this happened and what might be possible to do to prevent it in the future.

Because sometimes autistic people struggle to understand how to fit in socially, they may do anything they feel necessary to fit in with peers.

First, let me say OMG this is so true. I have done things for people that no rational person would ever do. I have loaned money, I have done favors, I have massively inconvenienced myself and my family just to make one person happy more times than I care to admit.

If you know a person who is on the spectrum and you see them destroying certain parts of their life just for that “one new friend,” and they are doing so without any form of rational thought please talk to them.

Also, if you have employees who are on the spectrum, and see other employees asking “favors of a friend” and that one employee working their guts out to make everyone else happy…please…I beg you, pull that guy working himself to death just to make people like him and tell him to work differently. Someone did that for me and it changed my professional life. Now, if I am not sure if it is happening again I ask my sounding board (neurotypical wife) and she helps me sort through it. It has saved me a lot of time trouble and pain.

Why people do this to autistics, other than their own laziness, is beyond me. I wouldn’t do that to someone, and I now despise it when I see that it is happening to me. Someday I’ll figure out how to not hold a grudge, but I’m not there yet!

Autistics as targets…scapegoats for others part 4 of 7

This is part 4 of a series. If you have not read part 1, I encourage you to do so, and but if not, everything in italics is carry over from that post in case you have not seen it. If you have, skip past that part and move forward to the new information.

As some of you know I am on the autism spectrum. I am what is known as a highly functional autistic. Do I accomplish things? Sure. Do I have many of the traits autistics have, absolutely. Do I wish I didn’t? Well, I’d be lying if I didn’t say there are days…but then there are days I think I’m just who I am.

My case is a little different than most. I didn’t know I was on the spectrum until I was older (in my 40s). How could that have happened? Well I can sum it up quickly.

About ten years ago I got married to a wonderful, very understanding woman. We have three kids. About the time number two came along we had kids to pediatricians as every parent does. We answered all the questions about a variety of subjects, well our second son is on the spectrum. Then, I called my mother (the child’s grandmother) with a “kid update” and the subject came up. Low and behold, my mother said something along the lines of you were diagnosed with that as a kid and we never told you.

What?

You what?

First, how could you not tell someone. But that’s not the point here. If I had known that years prior it could have saved me from making some huge mistakes in life, or at least allowed me to arm myself appropriately. Am I still angry about this? Well, in some ways, but I can’t change the past, and I can’t change who I am so I’m moving on.

Why put all this on my website, especially when you can see at the top that I have written some books that I hope you read and enjoy? Well, I came across this blog on wordpress called askpergers (askpergers.wordpress.com) that is really well done. He deserves some thank you from me for helping me understand a few things.

The author had a post that deserves some attention. He listed out 7 different reasons for autistics being the targets of bullies, people who would take advantage of someone, or in general what I like to call assholes.

I will go into all 7 of his reasons and why I agree with him or can offer up some measure of personal example of how this happened and what might be possible to do to prevent it in the future.

Autistic people tend to take things literally, making them very easy to manipulate

Ok, as an autistic I may not be the best person to explain when this happens. It happens to me all the time. People say “hey let’s get you a promotion,” to me means a promotion is coming….now. It doesn’t mean what most people think.

Hey “I really liked your idea,” could mean yeah it was cute, but not going to be done in this case. To me that is fantastic let’s move forward.

People pick up on this. If they want me to take a crap task when I’m working for someone else you will hear things like “this kind of thing really matters at year end reviews,” which means it matters, but it won’t help. You can list it on your accomplishments but it won’t help you get anywhere because it is a task no one cares about, no one wants and anyone can do (they just avoid).

I take that to mean it will help and the next six months are spent working on this crap task, and it does me no good. This was commonplace when I made my living as an engineer, which I no longer do, but be careful if you fall into the same category I did!

BTW, if you are not autistic and you do find people who take stuff literally, and you do this kind of thing to them…shame on you. It advances YOUR career at the cost of someone else’s and I hope you don’t sleep well and giant fire ants invade your next picnic.

 

Autistics as targets…scapegoats for others part 3 of 7

This is part 3 of a series. If you have not read part 1, I encourage you to do so, and but if not, everything in italics is carry over from that post in case you have not seen it. If you have, skip past that part and move forward to the new information.

 

As some of you know I am on the autism spectrum. I am what is known as a highly functional autistic. Do I accomplish things? Sure. Do I have many of the traits autistics have, absolutely. Do I wish I didn’t? Well, I’d be lying if I didn’t say there are days…but then there are days I think I’m just who I am.

My case is a little different than most. I didn’t know I was on the spectrum until I was older (in my 40s). How could that have happened? Well I can sum it up quickly.

About ten years ago I got married to a wonderful, very understanding woman. We have three kids. About the time number two came along we had kids to pediatricians as every parent does. We answered all the questions about a variety of subjects, well our second son is on the spectrum. Then, I called my mother (the child’s grandmother) with a “kid update” and the subject came up. Low and behold, my mother said something along the lines of you were diagnosed with that as a kid and we never told you.

What?

You what?

First, how could you not tell someone. But that’s not the point here. If I had known that years prior it could have saved me from making some huge mistakes in life, or at least allowed me to arm myself appropriately. Am I still angry about this? Well, in some ways, but I can’t change the past, and I can’t change who I am so I’m moving on.

Why put all this on my website, especially when you can see at the top that I have written some books that I hope you read and enjoy? Well, I came across this blog on wordpress called askpergers (askpergers.wordpress.com) that is really well done. He deserves some thank you from me for helping me understand a few things.

The author had a post that deserves some attention. He listed out 7 different reasons for autistics being the targets of bullies, people who would take advantage of someone, or in general what I like to call assholes.

I will go into all 7 of his reasons and why I agree with him or can offer up some measure of personal example of how this happened and what might be possible to do to prevent it in the future.

People with autism are not able to read body language or other social cues, which makes it hard to read intentions.

In other words, if you have a weekly poker game, bring an autistic. Ok, that was a joke.

Seriously, in any kind of business negotiation would you want to be the person that actually has to depend upon what people say instead of their body language? I have learned this one the really hard way over the years.

Should I name names here? Oh if only I were allowed to. There are so many people out there in business situations, exchanges and negotiations that do NOT say what they mean, they say some vague thing that can be interpreted a variety of ways (in some cases they outright lie). It is up to you, the receiver of their spewed forth crap to interpret what it is they really mean.

That is why, especially after a more recent debacle, I always get things in writing. If you are on the spectrum and negotiating something do not depend on what people say. Get it in writing, and then have someone else review it for you (a lawyer comes to mind). That advice actually works for non-autistics as well, but most neurotypical people are better at picking up the scumbags from the non scumbags than I am.

Autistics as targets…scapegoats for others part 2 of 7

This is part 2 of a series. If you have not read part 1, I encourage you to do so, and but if not, everything in italics is carry over from that post in case you have not seen it. If you have, skip past that part and move forward to the new information.

 

As some of you know I am on the autism spectrum. I am what is known as a highly functional autistic. Do I accomplish things? Sure. Do I have many of the traits autistics have, absolutely. Do I wish I didn’t? Well, I’d be lying if I didn’t say there are days…but then there are days I think I’m just who I am.

My case is a little different than most. I didn’t know I was on the spectrum until I was older (in my 40s). How could that have happened? Well I can sum it up quickly.

About ten years ago I got married to a wonderful, very understanding woman. We have three kids. About the time number two came along we had kids to pediatricians as every parent does. We answered all the questions about a variety of subjects, well our second son is on the spectrum. Then, I called my mother (the child’s grandmother) with a “kid update” and the subject came up. Low and behold, my mother said something along the lines of you were diagnosed with that as a kid and we never told you.

What?

You what?

First, how could you not tell someone. But that’s not the point here. If I had known that years prior it could have saved me from making some huge mistakes in life, or at least allowed me to arm myself appropriately. Am I still angry about this? Well, in some ways, but I can’t change the past, and I can’t change who I am so I’m moving on.

Why put all this on my website, especially when you can see at the top that I have written some books that I hope you read and enjoy? Well, I came across this blog on wordpress called askpergers (askpergers.wordpress.com) that is realy well done. He deserves some thank you from me for helping me understand a few things.

The author had a post that deserves some attention. He listed out 7 different reasons for autistics being the targets of bullies, people who would take advantage of someone, or in general what I like to call assholes.

I will go into all 7 of his reasons and why I agree with him or can offer up some measure of personal example of how this happened and what might be possible to do to prevent it in the future.

Autistic people may not have as big a circle of friends to stand up for them as other people do

It has always been a challenge for me to make friends either inside or outside the workplace. When I make friends I tend to be clingy, I tend to want to spend every single moment with that person and if I don’t get that opportunity I assume something is wrong, then things get worse (especially with women prior to my wife, God bless her patience).

As a result there are very few people willing to “stick up for me.” You know how it goes. You are at lunch, on a break…someone says “hey what do you think about so and so.” It’s either he’s hard to get to know, or he’s clingy, or needy, or whatever. However, because I don’t have as many or make friends as quickly there is no one there (commonly) yes he’s a good guy! He should be put in this other job, handle these other tasks, bring him to the ball game, whatever the case that doesn’t happen for me.

That also leaves me in a position where in a career bullying may not be present (although it has been) but I am the guy who gets the work no one else wants. Typically this work is thankless and NOT the kind of thing that leads to promotion. It is the crap, the stuff no one wants, not high profile at all. It is a large challenge for me, and remains so to this day, but it is something I strive to improve upon personally. Hopefully someday I’ll get it right, then I can get the work that matters.

The challenge also, at least for me, is that when I do get the work that matters other people tend to find a way to take credit for it. Then it is my word against theirs on who actually did it, and it won’t be a fight you win alone, thus the need for friends in the right places! See, these social things really do matter. I wish I knew that earlier on in my career, but that’s ok you learn new things in life and move forward!

 

Autistics as targets…scapegoats for others part 1 of 7

As some of you know I am on the autism spectrum. I am what is known as a highly functional autistic. Do I accomplish things? Sure. Do I have many of the traits autistics have, absolutely. Do I wish I didn’t? Well, I’d be lying if I didn’t say there are days…but then there are days I think I’m just who I am.
My case is a little different than most. I didn’t know I was on the spectrum until I was older (in my 40s). How could that have happened? Well I can sum it up quickly.
About ten years ago I got married to a wonderful, very understanding woman. We have three kids. About the time number two came along we had kids to pediatricians as every parent does. We answered all the questions about a variety of subjects, well our second son is on the spectrum. Then, I called my mother (the child’s grandmother) with a “kid update” and the subject came up. Low and behold, my mother said something along the lines of you were diagnosed with that as a kid and we never told you.
What?
You what?
First, how could you not tell someone. But that’s not the point here. If I had known that years prior it could have saved me from making some huge mistakes in life, or at least allowed me to arm myself appropriately. Am I still angry about this? Well, in some ways, but I can’t change the past, and I can’t change who I am so I’m moving on.
Why put all this on my website, especially when you can see at the top that I have written some books that I hope you read and enjoy? Well, I came across this blog on wordpress called askpergers (askpergers.wordpress.com) that is realy well done. He deserves some thank you from me for helping me understand a few things.
The author had a post that deserves some attention. He listed out 7 different reasons for autistics being the targets of bullies, people who would take advantage of someone, or in general what I like to call assholes.
I will go into all 7 of his reasons and why I agree with him or can offer up some measure of personal example of how this happened and what might be possible to do to prevent it in the future.
Autistic people tend to stand out from the crowd.
He points out that bullies will pick on someone who is even the slightest different from everyone else. Personally, I have seen this, we all have. Here is the problem, as I have seen it, especially as it pertains to autistics in the workplace. Early on in my career it wasn’t a big issue. There were enough people at some levels, the “crowd” was so large, that it didn’t matter that much that I was different. Standing out in that crowd is ok, encouraged even. Then you advance a little and a little more and a little more, then you hit a cieling. What happened?
If you get up to a certain level in your career standing out isn’t all that great. You want to be “one of the in crowd.” The group that to get to that next level of your career is well connected socially, in other words, the person everyone likes. That is really very hard for an autistic because we suck at communication (yes I know the irony for a guy who, at least in part, makes his living writing books). Trust me when I tell you that a multi-edit pass at a book for an autistic is a great thing compares to a conversation where we must get it right the first time.
Back to my point. Some autistics have risen to great positions. Dan Akroyd is on the spectrum, I read somewhere Bill Gates, and I applaud each and every one. However, fitting in at these corporate networking events is not the same thing. This is the kind of thing that drives an autistic into a corner (or can). For me it is just exhausting and on the nights I think I did a great job with that networking I later find I didn’t.
So, what advice can I give? Simple, if you are like me, and on the spectrum, do your best to understand that you aren’t like everyone else. Are you better? Worse? Or just different? Well, who the hell knows, but different is obvious. Also, and I am finding this to be more true every day, let people know you are on the spectrum and they will be very understanding. It isn’t a disability, it isn’t something to hide from, it is what it is, people can be good. Others, can take advantage of you, and you just have to trust (sometimes) that you will be around good people. Then, learn how to spot the bad ones, or like I did, marry the right woman and listen to her.
Do people bully austistics? Find them easy scapegoats for a large problem when someone is trying to shift blame? Do the autistics become victims? That does happen. Does it happen because the victim is autistics or because some people are total jerks? Perhaps a little of both.